Lore Olympus: Volume 2

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Gorgeous

This series continues to be so incredibly simple and yet so beautifully done. I was a massive fan of the first installment of Lore Olympus (check out my original review here!), and the second volume does not disappoint.

Persephone and Hades are now friends, bordering on more. They both clearly have feelings for one another, but their lots in life and general personalities keep them from reaching out and being honest about their feelings. Persephone, still the innocent woman she is, continually believes in the good in other people, even when they disappoint her. Apollo needs to die.

I love Persephone as a character. She could easily be written as a character who is stuck and without agency, but as the volume progresses, we see Persephone become more aware of the world around her. She uses her newfound knowledge of the world to stand up for herself in situations, regardless of whether she’s listened to, which is a step forward for her character-wise. She’s the equivalent of a homeschooled child thrust into a public school for the first time, and she’s just trying her best to keep up.

On the other hand, Hades deals with all the drama from the more adult side of the world. Jealousy is rife when Hades is involved, both from himself and the other women involved in his life. Other women, even those closest to him, are constantly manipulating both him and others to get what they want, and Hades is doing his best to keep the status quo despite having mixed feelings. Persephone is a temptation to him, but he also deeply cares for her, and it’s interesting to see this comic take their 150+ year age difference into account.

The art continues to astound me, and I cannot wait until Volume 3 is released.

Title:   Lore Olympus (Vol. 2)
Author: Rachel Smythe
Format: Hardcover
Pages: 368
ISBN: 9780593356081

Three Descriptors: High-Drama, Colorful, Complex

Read Alikes:
Punderworld by Linda Sejic
The One Hundred Nights of Hero by Isabel Greenberg
Neon Gods by Katee Robert
The Wicked and the Divine by Kieron Gillen

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